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Fort Hood Soldiers pitch in to support local community fest

Email   Print   Share By Staff Sgt. Gregory Sanders, 504th BfSB Public Affairs
September 26, 2013 | News
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Residents make their way through the main grounds of the Nolanville Trainwhistle Jamboree Sept. 14. The jamboree, originally scheduled as part of National Night out, is an annual festival meant to bring businesses and residents together for one night to celebrate the community with live entertainment, carnival rides and vendors, provided by volunteers.
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Ethan Burns, 10, pulls the chord on the M1984 wrecker, and smiles at the resounding horn during the 2nd Annual Trainwhistle Jamboree in Nolanville, Sept. 14. Misty Burns, Ethan’s Mother, said the Family moved from California and enjoys the “small town feel” Nolanville offers.
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Volunteers and city council members watch the closing fireworks of the Trainwhistle Jamboree in Nolanville, Sept. 14.
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A boy takes a look through the site of the M1200 Knight vehicle during the Trainwhistle Jamboree Sept. 14, in Nolanville. (Photos by Staff Sgt. Gregory Sanders, 504th BFSB Public Affairs.)
NOLANVILLE – Soldiers assigned to 504th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade teamed up with Nolanville as they took part in the town’s Trainwhistle Jamboree, Sept. 14.

“We appreciate all the people, military, businesses and citizens that are out here today,” said Dennis Biggs, a council member and vendor at the festival. “It seems like the military comes out more compared to the past. It’s important the Army come out so people get a chance to understand what the Army does.”

Young residents explored an M1200 Knight and an M1984 wrecker on display, marveling at the size of the tires, excitedly looking through a surveillance sight and laughing at the wrecker horn’s volume.

Older residents came to see some of the newer equipment the Army is using.

Soldiers’ involvement is importtant to area communities.

“It’s important to show support of local communities,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony Whitney, the 504th BfSB command sergeant major. “Our involvement allows residents to gain an understanding of what we do and the equipment we use. It means a lot to the community.”

The Jamboree, originally scheduled as part of National Night out, is an annual festival meant to bring businesses and residents together for one night to celebrate the community with live entertainment, carnival rides and vendors, provided mainly by volunteers.

“We couldn’t do it without them, and we couldn’t do this without the residents of Nolanville,” Richard Kincaid, a Killeen business owner, said.
 
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